October 21st: What are you voting for?

When you go to vote on October 21st, you will have to decide between several candidates to elect Calgary’s Mayor and City Councillors. What are the issues that matter to you? When you vote for someone what do they stand for? You can find here information on some of the most important issues of the coming election as well as data on the campaign's funding of the 2010 election.

We hope you can use the articles and data to question your candidates and evaluate their promises.

CivicCamp is pleased to announce general availability of Disclosure 2013, a web-based system that offers candidates a way to easily share campaign revenues and their sources with the public.

Check out the forums schedule, livestreaming details, and links to recorded forums!

A lot of money is spent on municipal elections in Calgary, just under $5.6 million in 2010. But who are the contributors to the candidates’ campaigns?

Inform your vote! Read the PDF version of the Citizen’s Guide for 2013 Municipal Elections

2013 Election Citizen's Guide

 

Read CivicCamp's report on Campaign Finances from 2010 Calgary Municipal Election.

Understanding how 2010 municipal campaign was funded in just one infographics.

Check out the forums schedule, livestreaming details, and links to recorded forums!

In February, 2013, a Citizens’ Information Guide Group (CIGG) was formed within CivicCamp. Its purpose was twofold...

Inform your vote! Read the PDF version of the Citizen’s Guide for 2013 Municipal Elections

When people make choices to live in a floodplain, buy or rent more than a basic home, or live in a suburban or urban setting, they make lifestyle choices, often referred to as “consumer choice.”

What do I need to vote? Where can I vote?

Housing affordability continues to be a serious problem in Calgary because of the low vacancy rate, housing prices that rise faster than incomes, and the competing demands within family budgets between housing costs and the costs of transportation

What is discussed in City Council meetings?

According to the City of Calgary, voter turn-out for the 2010 municipal election was around 53%, as opposed to only 33% in 2007. But we can do better!

What type of mobility options do we want? How do we responsibly plan the infrastructure?

A secondary suite is a self-contained living space in a single family home or on its lot, e.g., basement suite, garage apartment.

CivicCamp is pleased to announce general availability of Disclosure 2013, a web-based system that offers candidates a way to easily share campaign revenues and their sources with the public.

How do we manage the risks going forward?

A lot of money is spent on municipal elections in Calgary, just under $5.6 million in 2010. But who are the contributors to the candidates’ campaigns?

To serve new developments in our growing city, the City has to plan for new infrastructure such as roads and sewage treatment, as well as services such as police and garbage collection.

When City Council approves a new subdivision, it commits to providing services to the residents. These services range from roads and transit to drinking water, parks and social services.